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anon of anon 18/01/2013 [0]

Should we ban ipads at congress?

Mobile devices are proving a real distraction at our meetings and seminars, especially tablets! People seem incapable of just sitting and listening to the speaker without looking at their iPad (other tablets are available). Is it time we banned them from meetings??? Can we/should we do this?



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anon 03/01/2013 [0]

How do you price webstreaming?

We're web-streaming various tracks from congress - including keynote speakers- and wondered if anyone had any tips re.pricing. Some of team think it should be free (!) but wouldn't that annoy members who have paid to turn up? I was thinking charging 25% of congress fee for full access...?



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Anon, in-house congress organiser 11/12/2012 [1]

Speaker 'off message'

Grrr. So our keynote speaker was fine, but his presentation was only (very) vaguely related to the blurb in our programme, which made our association look stupid and resulted in some negative feedback from delegates. So...how do you ensure speakers say what they say they're going to say?

Anonymous user 17/12/2012

Chances are this isn't the first time. Ideally, seeing the speaker before hiring them might help prevent this kind of outcome. Using speakers' bureaus might also do the trick, especially for keynotes.



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anon 31/10/2012 [4]

Subvention or bribery

We have three serious bids for our 2016 congress, which is a nice position to be in, but I have an issue with one. CVB is offering to fly our board and CEO business class to destination. I've been through our byelaws and can't find anything that would explicity prohibit this - but isn't this just bribery? Or am I being just over-sensitive? Confused.

Christine Bartolo Parnis of Mclean Events International Ltd 16/11/2012

I do not see anything wrong in pampering a potential customer, after all we are in the hospitality industry, so why not show it !

Thomas Reiser of International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis 30/11/2012

I would recommend to address these things ideally in the bid document so all CVBs can address this the same way and you will not have such a dilemma. In absence of a clear guideline on this, I would still ask all bids to treat the travel the same way in order not to create (even a perceived) advantage potentially distracting from the more important strategic elements of a bid.

Kerrin MacPhie of ACC Liverpool 14/12/2012

International Congresses usually bring great economic impact, running into millions of pounds to a destination, therefore, when you look at the cost of flights against the value of your event it will be minimal in the overall scheme of things. Good luck with your search.

Christian Mutschlechner of Vienna Convention Bureau 14/12/2012

I think it has te be defined clearly in the RFP (and also be binding for the Board Members) what is allowed and what is not allowed for bidders. If there are no clear rules (inlcuding that non following the rules the bidder is out) you can not prevent bidders to do whaetever they believe need to do to influence the result of the process in their favour.



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ANON 04/10/2012 [6]

PCO - yes, or no?

We've run our events in-house for years, but need to start making them sweat a bit more. We're considering hiring the services of a PCO, but not sure what extra they bring to the table? What can they do that we can't do ourselves? Any experiences/advice appreciated....

UK-based executive director of large international association.

Ivo Miksa of Guarant Ltd 09/10/2012

Well, when working with proper PCO you will benefit from their know-how (acquired while working with many different clients), you will not pay extra time for your staff - they will easily distribute the workload and your meetings should benefit from specialist services and solutions developed over much broader base then your own. (I am a PCO owner myself)

Rachel Frankel of Congrex UK 12/10/2012

It's the age old argument: to outsource or not? You can put in your own kitchen or have a professional do it. The end result is something you live with for a long time and it’s the legacy that’s at stake here.

The PCO works with you, acts as your partner, gets to know how you work and understands the expectations for your event. The end result should be much more than the sum of the parts: a memorable, exciting, inspirational meeting that pulls in the delegates, is loved by sponsors and positions the society and the meeting for growth in years to come: a win-win for all!

Kerrin Honey of Congrex UK 19/10/2012

The value a PCO brings depends on finding the right company who will work in partnership with the association. One who assists you in achieving your conference and association objectives, both in the short and long term. Associations are a unique sector, therefore it is essential to find a PCO who is specialised and experienced in working with associations. As experts in the field of event planning they have a wealth of experience and knowledge, which is applied to your event. Their core skills are regularly invested in through the training and development of the staff. They know how to maximise the participant experience and effectively disseminate content. In addition, they monitor the latest advances and trends ensuring that events are adapted to suit the continually changing requirements of participants. A PCO has established relationships with stakeholders and suppliers that when combined with the strength of their buying power will result in you receiving the best possible offer, best possible experience and ultimately cost-savings. For an international association a global PCO can give you greater access to participants, stakeholders and support in future international destinations. They are a strategic partner who contributes to the success of future events and to the association itself. This is just an overview as I prefer to understand more about the association before demonstrating our value as this should be specific to the association’s requirements and objectives.

I represent Congrex, a global PCO, and am based in the UK. We have 30 years experience and specialise in planning conferences for associations. I, of course, would welcome a more in-depth discussion with you.

Anne Doherty of Happening 19/10/2012

I agree with Ivo, but also think that you need to take into account the costs of your current staff v the skills they currently have. With a good PCO (and yes I am the managing director of one!) you get a much more rounded service - for a cost of a full time equivalent member of staff you could have a number of PCO staff working on your events who can not only manage the project but engage with your target audience and sponsors / exhibitors, look after the registration and financials and work with you to deliver your key objectives. Having worked with many in-house teams we always welcome the opportunity to demonstrate our flexibility and 'can do' attitude.

Anonymous user 19/10/2012

Suggest you look at what added value areas you may like to find from a PCO.
Growing delegate number; delegate
communications; web broadcast or live streaming of content/sessions; attracting additional local or international sposnorship. These are just a few areas beyond the actual event management which a PCO may be able to bring added value to your events.

Try contacting some other International Associations who have worked with PCO's as well their own events and get their input.

There are few contact points for you to explore this with other Associations but you could attend Association forums at EIBTM in Barcelona in November, International Association Congress in Estoril, Lisbon in April 2013 or IMEX in Frankfurt in May 2013 and get to discuss this with a variety of like minded International Associations.

Deidre Keegan CVB Representative for destinations promoting to International Associations

Kerrin Honey of Congrex UK 23/10/2012

The value a PCO brings depends on finding the right company who will work in partnership with the association. One who assists you in achieving your conference and association objectives, both in the short and long term. Associations are a unique sector, therefore it is essential to find a PCO who is specialised and experienced in working with associations. As experts in the field of event planning they have a wealth of experience and knowledge, which is applied to your event. Their core skills are regularly invested in through the training and development of the staff. They know how to maximise the participant experience and effectively disseminate content. In addition, they monitor the latest advances and trends ensuring that events are adapted to suit the continually changing requirements of participants. A PCO has established relationships with stakeholders and suppliers that when combined with the strength of their buying power will result in you receiving the best possible offer, best possible experience and ultimately cost-savings. For an international association a global PCO can give you greater access to participants, stakeholders and support in future international destinations. They are a strategic partner who contributes to the success of future events and to the association itself. This is just an overview as I prefer to understand more about the association before demonstrating our value as this should be specific to the association’s requirements and objectives.

I represent Congrex, a global PCO, and am based in the UK. We have 30 years experience and specialise in planning conferences for associations



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eventpaula 17/09/2012 [0]

Speaker ROI - help?

Can someone advise what's a reasonable fee for a 'middle-weight' celebrity speaker? And anyone got any thoughts on ROI - is it actually worth it? First time our association's gone down this route.



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