Mailbag

Please click here to post a new thread


Mark Dodds of Roythornes Solicitors 13/07/2018 [1]

Speak now or be forever bitter...

Well done to Nick de Bois of the Events Industry Board in encouraging the events sector to speak up about Brexit (MIT July). It's no use sitting round our boardroom tables moaning about Brexit and how it's impacting on our businesses if we don't let the leaders of the negotiations know. We're all busy people but we all have an MP and the ability to write. So join industry groups, comment on consultations and get involved in the debate. March 2019 is the end of the process and if we snooze until then we will only have ourselves to blame if the outcome isn't quite what we'd like!

Sarah Webster of Ms 17/07/2018

Would that be the same Nick de Bois now working for Brexit Secretary Dominic Raab, who has just called for a "turning back the clock" on employment regulations? That'll be the Working Time Regulations out the window then. Great for employers, not so great for eventsprofs already suffering from a long-hours working culture.



Please note that your comment is restricted to a maximum of 3500 characters
Mark Dodds of Roythornes Solicitors 22/05/2018 [1]

Brexit increases are inevitable, but does ‘opportunity knock’?

The increase in staff costs already being experienced by the hospitality industry is, I am afraid an inevitable consequence of Brexit (‘Why Brexit could push up venue prices’, MIT May 2018).

Any sector that employs a large proportion of non-UK nationals will be hit – we know about hospitality, but look also at fresh produce where growers are already saying crops will be left in the field this year because of staff shortages.

Nobody likes uncertainly and we cannot blame people who are concerned about their future in this country (despite assurances from the government) for considering whether it is the place they want to stay and settle with their families.

However Saar Sharon is absolutely right when he says it brings great opportunity with the potential employment of groups such as the over 50s, ex-armed forces and ex-offenders. There is a massive and talented workforce out there and businesses that realise this and act on these opportunities will undoubtedly thrive.



Please note that your comment is restricted to a maximum of 3500 characters
Andy Hammond, Elite Event Connections of II 18/05/2018 [0]

In defence of smaller agencies

I felt compelled to respond to the article "Hero to Zero" in your Supplier Sounds Off section in last month's magazine and I do so on behalf of small agencies in the UK. I have to say it was a rather spiteful piece by someone who, surprise surprise, remains anonymous and really shouldn't be working in this industry if they harbour that level of contempt for smaller agencies. It was rather sweeping condemnation of a sizable proportion of the UK MICE agencies and born out of bitterness rather than any real facts. Given that this unnamed person pointed at comments I'd made gives me even more reason to fight my corner. Commission is a hot topic at the moment and it's just one business model that companies use. Like many of the smaller agencies I work on a commission-only basis and, unlike what was suggested in your article, negotiate better rates where I can and if the client wants me to. I also use the contacts that I've met through years of attending forums, exhibitions and networking events to find the best venues to fit the brief; and yes, if I need to I use the internet to research other ones - is there something wrong with that? My proposals are concise, professional and contain all the information needed for the client to make a decision. This all takes time and that's what we smaller agencies offer - a time-saving service that utilises our relationships with suppliers.
I'm not going to get into a debate about bigger agencies but it's a well-known fact that most of these are on significant overrides with the big hotel chains and this narrows down the options to the client as they only want to work with their preferred suppliers. Smaller agencies offer the full spectrum of hotels and venues to their clients; clients that they've nurtured relationships with for many years. They might do it from our offices or from our spare room - again, does that matter? For your anonymous person to suggest that we play no real part in the industry shows how little they know.



Please note that your comment is restricted to a maximum of 3500 characters
Mark Dodds of Roythornes Solicitors 29/03/2018 [0]

‘Same old’ doesn’t win the day.

I heartily agree with David Taylor (MIT March 2018) that hotels need to improve their game to compete as venues. Many are relying on the same booking systems, format and service levels that they have used for the past ten years not realising that there is a new ‘breed’ of innovative, impressive and unique venues hard on their heels.

Let’s face it, most hotel rooms are precisely the same as each another and never exciting or awe inspiring. So whilst they cannot compete on location, and certainly don’t on price, hotels need to take a look at and improve their selling proposition before their ‘fully equipped, Wi-Fi enabled flexible spaces’ are left empty.



Please note that your comment is restricted to a maximum of 3500 characters
Edward Moss of Maykit Events 04/02/2018 [0]

Yet ANOTHER hotel comparison site . . . . . of sorts!

I noticed an advertisement on the side of a bus for a new hotel search site operated by a certain budget airline we all love to hate. So as not to either raise heckles or encourage legal action, or both, let's say, in the true spirit of Welsh comedian Rhod Gilbert, that the airline rhymes with Brian Hair.

Notwithstanding this particular hotel comparison site has decided to self-award itself a state of being one of the UK's "leading" (presumably in the same manner that all recruitment companies seem to recruit without exception for "leading" companies), I am curious if the hotel room sales model used follows that of its parent airline, namely:

The basic hotel room is £9.99. However, after adding bed, bed linen and towel supplement, luggage storage cost, clothes hanger supplement, kettle fee, TV token and bathroom admission fee, with all of the aforementioned costs totally translucent on the website until purchase, will the final check-out price of said hotel room top out nearer the price of booking directly with the hotel in the first place?

And yes, I am a comparison website cynic. Possibly the largest cynic in the north of England.

Ed Moss
Maykit Events



Please note that your comment is restricted to a maximum of 3500 characters
Martin Ellis, Team Umbrella of II 23/01/2018 [0]

Checking the facts

I just wanted to comment on one of the commentaries in the “Keyhole” section on page 50 of the Jan M&IT magazine. ( http://www.meetpie.com/documents/archives/MIT_907278_KEYHOLE.pdf )

It suggests that the Conservative Association in Dewsbury were somewhat insensitive for holding an event in a mining museum, due in part to the “section explaining what happened to the coal industry in the 1980s”. One can only assume that this is a thinly veiled reference to the pit closures under the Conservative government of the time. I do wonder if it also shows that far more pits were closed in the 1970s under a Labour Prime Minister, namely Harold Wilson? I realise that in this age it’s not unusual for facts to be conveniently overlooked, but these facts might suggest that no political events from either mainstream party be held at the museum? Or of course we could just use such an incident to have a pop at the local Tories, as would seem fashionable.



Please note that your comment is restricted to a maximum of 3500 characters

*<<   <<   Page 1 of 80   >>   >>*